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Let us Help You2018-10-31T11:01:01+00:00

TASK ASSISTANCE DOGS

THERAPY DOGS

STABILITY ASSISTANCE DOGS

COMMUNITY DOGS

TASK ASSISTANCE DOGS

What does an assistance dog do?

Disability can lead to isolation, loss of confidence and feelings of low self-esteem. Not only that but for many people living with a disability being unable to do even a simple task like picking up the post can leave them feeling depressed and dependent. Dogs for the Disabled trains dogs to assist with practical, everyday tasks to help a person with a disability to live life to the full, breaking down barriers to the outside world and helping to improve confidence and stress levels.

These are just some of the range of tasks that an assistance dog trained by the charity will be able to help with:

  • Open and close doors
  • Help a person dress and undress
  • Bark to raise the alarm in an emergency
  • Retrieve items such as a telephones or dropped articles like keys or a bag
  • Empty the washing machine
  • Fetch the post
  • Switch the lights on and off
  • Press a pedestrian crossing button
  • Help people to walk by providing a stable base and forward motion

THERAPY DOGS

Some of our dogs that do not graduate as Assistance Dogs, become Therapy Dogs. Here are some examples what our Therapy Dogs currently do:

  • Provide Companionship (e.g. for People suffering with dementia )
  • Mental Health Services (e.g. one of our dogs sits in on counselling sessions with a Psychotherapist )
  • Work with Children with Intellectual Disabilities

STABILITY ASSISTANCE DOGS

We have developed a highly successful Stability Assistance Dog Programme. It is the only one we know of in Europe. It works by pairing a child who has severe difficulty walking with one of our very suitable Stability Assistance Dogs.

The timing of all of this is really critical because as the child needs to be paired with the dog before they are 12 years old, at the very latest. After this age they will be too heavy / not have enough muscle developed to be able to safely work with the dog.

We’ve seen dramatic improvement in our partners’ walking abilities with this programme and we are doing everything we can to expand it as much as we can.

COMMUNITY DOGS

Some more of our Dogs that do not graduate as Assistance Dogs work as Community Dogs. This is an example of what they do:

  • Working in Hospitals (e.g. interacting with the Patients and Staff in the Mercy University Hospital, Cork)

 

Hugo visits the Mercy Hospital Cork.

Since the Mercy Hospital hospital first opened its doors 160 years ago they have welcomed people from all walks of life. But today, during Mercy week, they broke with tradition and welcomed their first dog – Hugo, a therapy dog in training for Dogs for the Disabled. He became the first dog to therapeutically visit patients at the hospital following an invitation by Clinical Nurse Manager Nuala Coughlan.

Hugo visited patients on ten wards during his inaugural visit, touching patients and staff alike, and is looking forward to his return visit

YOU CAN HELP TRANSFORM A CHILD’S LIFE TODAY

DONATE

85% of our applicants are children living with a physical disability and the difference one of our highly trained assistance dogs makes is priceless. We depend entirely on donors like you, as we do not receive any government funding!

MAKE A DONATION…

SPONSOR A PUPPY

Meet Liz. Liz is one of our SuperStar Puppies! She is currently training to become a fully Qualified Assistance Dog. Your Puppy Sponsorship directly supports Liz through this 2 year journey.

SPONSOR LIZ OR ANOTHER SUPER PUPPY…